Daniela Vilema

Environmental Communicator for Marine Projects

Daniela Vilema works with the local community through outreach and environmental education, focusing mostly on shark conservation. Previously, she was a CDF volunteer and fellow.

She worked with Waorani communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon, supporting their reforestation and aquaculture projects with an environmental education program.

Articles

Galapagos Project Finalist of the Green Latinamerican Awards 2018

Puerto Santa Ana in Guayaquil was the venue for the fifth edition of the event: Latinoamerica Verde Awards (Green Latin America Awards), which each year strive to connect, exhibit and reward...

Underwater Cameras to Study Sharks in the Galapagos Islands

Written in collaboration with: Pelayo Salinas de León. Since 2013, the Charles Darwin Research Station’s shark team, in collaboration with the Galapagos National Park Directorate, ...

A New Shark Educational Exhibit in Progress in the Galapagos Islands

With more than 80,000 visitors annually, the Charles Darwin Research Station (CDRS) is one of the most visited places by tourists in the Galapagos Islands. The Van Straelen Interpretation Cen...

Experience and Fun, a Successful Tool to Learn about Sharks in the Galapagos Islands

The first time we met with our Shark Ambassadors group in 2017 at the Charles Darwin Research Station (CDRS), they looked curious about the activities we were about to develop. I remember asking...

Workshop: Climate Change Priorities for the Galapagos Marine Reserve

The Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF), a non-for-profit research institution that for almost 60 years has been the official scientific advisor to the Ecuadorian government, will be hosti...

Galapagos Shark Ambassadors in Action!

Take motivated students, add the ocean surrounding us, and you have the perfect combination to conduct conservation work. When you are at the beach, have you ever lifted a rock to find out wha...

Changing Perceptions about Sharks in the Galapagos Islands

The most common response when I talk to non-scientists about sharks, is that they are dangerous animals that, among other things, kill people. Actually, sharks are not killers; they are ...

Telling Scientific Stories with National Geographic

Written in collaboration with Paola Diaz-Freire. A National Geographic team arrived in Galapagos for four days to run a Story Telling Bootcamp directed to our staff members and other organisat...

Five New Sub-Species of the Marine Iguana in Galapagos

The Galapagos Marine Iguana is one of the key endemic species that is distributed throughout the archipelago. Recently, a team of European and Latin American scientists led by Dr. Sebas...

The Difficult Flight of Birds in Galapagos

How is a small fruit fly able to affect the finch population? What do the dwarf penguin, the flightless cormorant and the elegant albatross have in common? The life in Galapagos surprises...

The Fourth Mangrove Finch Captive-Rearing Season Begins

Climbing equipment, incubators and generators with solar panels are some of the tools that are part of the materials that the mangrove finch conservation project team requires to begin the fo...

Remembering the Story of Lonesome George in the Galapagos Islands

This February 23rd, the Government of Ecuador through the Ministry of the Environment brings back from the Museum of Natural History of New York, the embalmed body of the giant tortoise nativ...

Exploring the Depths of the Galapagos Islands

Written in collaboration with Etienne Rastoin. The coastal waters of the Galapagos archipelago have been of scientific interest for the last 30 years, however, the depths of the Marine Reserve ...

Sharing Environmental Education Experiences in South Africa

During the last year I worked on the education component of the project "The Galapagos Marine Reserve: A Model of Sustainable Coexistence between Humans and Sharks" with the support of the Save...

The “Protect the Fins” Campaign and Its Impact on the Community

We conclude with our campaign Protect the Fins and the Ocean Wins! Demonstrating that humans and sharks can coexist sustainably. After visiting all the schools in the archipelago and perfor...

DiveStat - Getting to Know the Divers in Galapagos

Written in collaboration with Nicolás Moity How many tourists come to Galapagos to dive? Where do these divers come from? Where are most of the sharks, mantas, turtles and other marine specie...

Monitoring Penguins and Cormorants in the West of the Galapagos

Written in collaboration with Gustavo Jiménez-Uzcategui. Galapagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus) and non-flying cormorants (Phalacrocorax harrisi) are two endemic species of the Galap...

Learning About Sharks in Galapagos

“Galapagos needs sharks, sharks need Galapagos”. This is the main focus of the environmental education workshops that have been developed for 5th, 6th and 7th graders in all the sch...

Protect the Fins and the Ocean Wins!

Did you know that a shark generates more than 5 million dollars in the span of its entire life in the Galapagos? Or that the Darwin and Wolf Islands host the highest shark biomass on the pla...

The “Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands”, in French “Fondation Charles Darwin pour les îles Galapagos”, Association International sans but lucratif (“AISBL”), has its registered office located at Drève du Pieuré 19, 1160 Brussels, and is registered under the trade registry of Brussels under the number 0409.359.103.

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