Make a Donation

Protect Galapagos through Science

Galápagos is home to some of the world’s most emblematic species: Galápagos penguins, green sea turtles, marine iguanas, Galápagos tortoises, flightless cormorants, scalloped hammerhead sharks, Galapagos sharks, Darwin finches, and many more.
These unique species live in a fragile ecosystem we have a duty to protect. But in the face of climate change, polluted oceans, illegal fishing, the growth in tourism, and accelerated spread of invasive species, its varied ecosystems are in danger.

Of all species registered in the enchanted islands, 4500 are marine species. Help our scientists and researchers protect these unique animals and their ecosystems through research, science and community engagement.

By donating to the Charles Darwin Foundation and its Research Station, you are helping our scientists continue their research in order to better protect the unique animals and ecosystems of the Galapagos Islands.

Our Impact

CDF has worked on 135 scientific projects since 2016

We are currently working on 40+ scientific projects across land and sea

We’ve researched 8 endangered and 5 critically endangered species (across land and sea)

30+ New deep-sea organisms discovered

Featured Projects

Image

Exploring yet unchartered sea mounts

The Galapagos is rife with underwater mountains which are productive habitats and host rich biodiversity. But little is known about these mysterious sea mounts which rise thousands of meters above the sea floor. With the help of expert taxonomists from all over the world, we have already identified 37 potentially new species to science and registered a previously unknown tropical kelp forest, but have so much more to uncover.

Saving Scalesia cordata from extinction

Scalesia cordata is a tree endemic to southern Isabela, with only a few trees left. Together with the Galapagos National Park Directorate, we are taking several management actions to prevent its local extinction and facilitate its recovery. A greenhouse on Isabela now cultivates this species with more than 1000 healthy and beautiful seedlings, waiting their turn to join the Scalesia populations. We’ve already planted 75 saplings, and our last expedition in November 2022 revealed natural regeneration with more than 250 seedlings at four of the original Scalesia sites.

Image
Image

Saving Scalesia cordata from extinction

Scalesia cordata is a tree endemic to southern Isabela, with only a few trees left. Together with the Galapagos National Park Directorate, we are taking several management actions to prevent its local extinction and facilitate its recovery. A greenhouse on Isabela now cultivates this species with more than 1000 healthy and beautiful seedlings, waiting their turn to join the Scalesia populations. We’ve already planted 75 saplings, and our last expedition in November 2022 revealed natural regeneration with more than 250 seedlings at four of the original Scalesia sites.

Image

Protecting landbirds from the Vampire fly

20 Galapagos bird species, including 12 species of Darwin’s finches, are under threat from the parasitic fly, Philornis downsi. This includes the critically endangered Mangrove Finch and vulnerable Little Vermilion Flycatcher, both endemic to the Galápagos Islands. Together with the Galapagos National Park Directorate we are overseeing a multi-institutional collaborative effort (now up to 22 institutions from ten countries) that is investigating the biology and ecology of this little-known fly, while simultaneously conducting research to find effective and environmentally friendly control methods.

Protecting sharks

We study various shark species and their relationship with their environment with the aim of providing a strong scientific basis for the development of effective management plans that will ensure their long-term protection inside and outside the Galapagos Marine Reserve.

The Silky shark was listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Our scientists are studying this species’ migration behavior to understand how to better protect them inside and outside the GMR. In 2021, we collaborated in a research that tagged 47 adult silky sharks and obtained amazing results. One female silky shark traveled nearly 7,000 kilometers, visiting marine protected areas of Galápagos, Cocos Island, and Malpelo along the way.

Image
Image

Protecting sharks

We study various shark species and their relationship with their environment with the aim of providing a strong scientific basis for the development of effective management plans that will ensure their long-term protection inside and outside the Galapagos Marine Reserve.

The Silky shark was listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Our scientists are studying this species’ migration behavior to understand how to better protect them inside and outside the GMR. In 2021, we collaborated in a research that tagged 47 adult silky sharks and obtained amazing results. One female silky shark traveled nearly 7,000 kilometers, visiting marine protected areas of Galápagos, Cocos Island, and Malpelo along the way.

Friends of the Charles Darwin Foundation

You can support the Charles Darwin Foundation and its Research Station’s efforts to conserve and protect Galápagos directly through the Friends of the Charles Darwin Foundation, our fiscal agent and charity partner in the United States.

Friends of the Charles Darwin Foundation is a 501c(3) non-profit organization and any donation received is fully tax-deductible for U.S. donors. We accept cash, cheques, stock and crypto currency. For more information or any questions, please reach out to fundraising@fcdarwin.org.ec.

Other ways to donate

Tax-deductible wire transfers for U.S. donors

Tax-deductible donations for U.S. donors can also be made via wire transfer to the Friends of the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands bank account in the U.S. If selecting this option, please contact us at fundraising@fcdarwin.org.ec.

Account: Friends of the Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands
Address: 420 Columbus Avenue, Suite 304, Valhalla, NY 10595-1382, United States
Bank: Citibank
Routing Number: 021-000-089
Account Number: 6780613592
SWIFT: CITIUS33
Address: Thornwood, NY, United States

Support our work in the Galapagos

Our work is only possible thanks to our generous donors' support.
Your gift contributes directly to our scientists' work at the Charles Darwin Research Station.
Help us protect Galapagos!
Donations in the US are tax deductible.

Sign up to the latest news

* required

Sign up to the latest news

* required

Photo credits: Jordi Chias, Kip Evans, Juan Manuel García, Pelayo Salinas, Joshua Vela.

The ‘Charles Darwin Foundation for the Galapagos Islands’, in French ‘Fondacion Charles Darwin  pour les Iles Galapagos’, Association Internationale sans but lucrative (AISBL), has its registered office at Avenue Louise 54, 1050 Brussels, Belgium. Trade Registry # 0409.359.103

© 2022 Charles Darwin Foundation. All rights reserved.